Can't Access Your Facebook Account? Help Is Here.



People continue to write to us asking about disabled accounts, which calls for a refresh of advice we’ve previously given on this topic.

Facebook’s help section offers numerous articles on what to do if you can’t access your account — but if you can’t log on to the site, how can you get to the pages offering advice on how to get back onto the social network?

Spokespeople for Facebook have told us that you don’t need to log on to be able to access Facebook’s help center at http://www.facebook.com/help — so the trick is to remember that address or jot it down somewhere to be prepared for the event that you can’t reach your account.

The help section includes a contact form you can fill out if you believe that Facebook erred in disabling your personal profile — http://www.facebook.com/help/contact.php?show_form=disabled – along with an area for reporting a possible hacking of your account, http://www.facebook.com/roadblock/roadblock_me.php?r=5 .

More often than not, Facebook disables an account because of some violation of the site’s rules, namely the Statement of Rights and Responsibilities. Most people don’t bother to read this legalese — if more folks did, there’d be fewer disabled accounts.


However, mistakes do happen, but the social network’s staff will own up to an error if pointed out as such. Of course, Facebook users love to complain about these instances, but compared to how many other technology companies handle glitches — well, we’re not complaining.

Certainly, whenever you’re the one with the blocked account, feelings of frustration can make it seem like the site is out to get you. Please know that’s not so.

And if you report an erroneous account blockage, try to take a deep breath and remind yourself to be patient. With nearly 700 million users, Facebook gets an immense amount of messages; while the site continues to expand its resources for handling situations like yours, it’s unrealistic to expect a speedy response. It’s better to anticipate the worst, and then be pleasantly surprised if and when things don’t turn out to be as bad as you’d thought.

Have you or someone you know ever had an account disabled by Facebook, temporarily or otherwise — if so, please share your experiences in the comments section.

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