Whether you’ve noticed it or not, Facebook has likely changed your brain. You get a rush of dopamine — that same chemical that kicks in when you’re rewarded — when you see a notification. People with more than 229 friends tend to have larger orbital prefrontal cortexes, the area for social behavior and emotion. An interesting infographic from Best Masters in Psychology details the social network’s effect on the brain.

However, addiction to Facebook has its definite drawbacks.

The team at Best Masters in Psychology found that Internet addicts have 10 percent to 20 percent smaller brain areas for important functions such as speech, memory, motor control, emotion, sensory, and other information. The more time that is spent online, the more the brain atrophies in these areas.

Want to know more? Check out the infographic:

Readers: Have you noticed behavioral changes since you’ve signed up for Facebook?

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