Maryland

Facebook Promises Revamped Research Policies

MikeSchroepfer

Facebook chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer issued the social network’s strongest response to date to the controversy over a 2012 study in which the News Feeds of 689,003 randomly selected Facebook users were manipulated in terms of positive or negative stories to gauge their emotional effects, promising in a Newsroom post that changes would be made to the way Facebook conducts research, including clearer guidelines, review teams, training, and a portal for all of the company’s research.

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Mediabistro Course

Podcasting

PodcastingLearn to develop, create, and launch your own podcast! On October 23, Steve Belaner, the host of the weekly podcast The Gamut, will teach you how to determine the goals of your podcast, perfect your concept, contact and book guests, market your podcast, and get your show up and running in just a few weeks. Register now!

Did Facebook’s Controversial 2012 News Feed Study Run Afoul of Maryland Law?

MarylandStateHouse304

The controversial 2012 study conducted by social scientists from Facebook, Cornell University and the University of California-San Francisco — in which the News Feeds of 689,003 randomly selected Facebook users were manipulated in terms of positive or negative stories to gauge their emotional effects — caused some issues for Facebook in Washington, D.C., and across its user base, and the study may actually have been illegal, at least in Maryland.

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Proposed Amendment To Password Protection Act Would Allow Employers To Demand Facebook Passwords During Company Investigations

CorporateInvestigator

The Password Protection Act of 2012 — which was introduced in both the Senate and House of Representatives last May, but not acted upon and sent to committee — was the subject of an amendment at the House Labor Committee that would make an exception to the prohibition of employers requesting the Facebook passwords of employees or applicants in the event of company investigations.

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