Psychology

STUDY: How Do Facebook Friends Affect The Job Hunt?

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Facebook is increasingly being used as a job search tool, both for employers and applicants. But it’s much more than that. Facebook users announce employment changes, chat with friends about openings, and seek out new opportunities with close friends and acquaintances. But how do these relationships on Facebook affect not only the likelihood of finding jobs, but job-seekers’ moods during the hunt? Facebook recently partnered with a Carnegie Mellon University researcher to find out.

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INFOGRAPHIC: The Psychology Of Facebook

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Whether you’ve noticed it or not, Facebook has likely changed your brain. You get a rush of dopamine — that same chemical that kicks in when you’re rewarded — when you see a notification. People with more than 229 friends tend to have larger orbital prefrontal cortexes, the area for social behavior and emotion. An interesting infographic from Best Masters in Psychology details the social network’s effect on the brain.

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